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SOLVED

Sling Job Queues

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Level 2

We recently had an incident where a large amount of content was activated by the authoring community resulting unresponsive publishers.  In addition to increasing memory and CPU on the publishers, I'm looking for possible configuration changes which would "throttle" the flush agents so the end users response time won't be severely impacted in the future.

First I thought maybe this was the answer

Tuning the Sling Job Queues

The bulk upload of large assets may be very resource intensive. By default the number of concurrent threads per job queue is equal to the number of CPU cores, which may cause an overall performance impact and high java heap consumption.

It is recommended to not exceed 50% of the cores. To change this value, go to : http://<host>:<port>/system/console/configMgr/org.apache.sling.event.jobs.QueueConfiguration and set queue.maxparallel to a value representing 50% of the CPU cores of the server hosting your AEM instance (eg. for 8 CPU cores, set the value to 4).  

My question is, does this affect replication flush agents or just workflow?

Might the Apache Sling Job Queue Configuration -> Queue: com/day/cq/replication/job/{0} be the answer?  It has a similar Maximium Parallel Jobs setting.  There's also a Priority setting on this config that I haven't tried out.  

 

Thanks

 Ned 

1 Accepted Solution

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Correct answer by
Employee Advisor

Hi Ned,

The replication has 2 sides: authoring and publishing. But the interface itself is the replication process, which is a serial process, that means from the view of a single publish instance there is no concurrency in replication. Only one replication process is handled at a time.

So if you have overload on publish, the performance on authoring side doesn't really matter. In best case whenever the publish has finished a replication request, the next one is coming immediately after. If author performance is impacted, it takes a bit of time until the next replication request comes in.

So to really limit the amount of used CPU on publish, you need to throttle the incoming replication requests. Throttling outgoing requests on authoring side is likely possible, but much harder to implement. (If you're interested in a solution I would recommend to raise a Daycare ticket for this topic.)

Jörg

View solution in original post

1 Reply

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Correct answer by
Employee Advisor

Hi Ned,

The replication has 2 sides: authoring and publishing. But the interface itself is the replication process, which is a serial process, that means from the view of a single publish instance there is no concurrency in replication. Only one replication process is handled at a time.

So if you have overload on publish, the performance on authoring side doesn't really matter. In best case whenever the publish has finished a replication request, the next one is coming immediately after. If author performance is impacted, it takes a bit of time until the next replication request comes in.

So to really limit the amount of used CPU on publish, you need to throttle the incoming replication requests. Throttling outgoing requests on authoring side is likely possible, but much harder to implement. (If you're interested in a solution I would recommend to raise a Daycare ticket for this topic.)

Jörg