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Customer Journey Mapping

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Community Advisor

What are the best practices and things to set up to map customer journey on website and make analysis of what and how users are navigating? What is the entry point?

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Correct answer by
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If you are exclusively using Adobe Analytics (as opposed to Customer Journey Analytics), you can look at Entry and Exit Pages (using the Entries and Exit metrics and your Page dimension), you can create Flow Diagrams (using Page or maybe custom dimensions like a page type value), you can create funnel reports for specific flows (usually conversion type flows that see where people are falling out of your intended progressions), you can use the Next/Previous Page panels to look specifically at before and after pages for key pages, etc.

 

There are a lot of things you can pull from a basic implementation.. however, depending on your website and what type of granular data you need/want to have available, that is where you really need to figure out what type of information to include as part of your tracking.

 

I deal with a lot of different types of sites, there are a few things I always include in my standard array of tracking, such as:

  • page type (home, section, article, listing, etc)
  • replication Page Name (that I make sure is sent on all pages and all actions like clicks)
  • URL (also on all pages and actions)
  • breakpoint (for responsive sites so I know how they were viewing the content)
  • site section (like the categorization, but I bundle generic pages under a generic section so there is always a value)
  • Logged In Status (if there is a log in - basically yes or no)
  • User ID / Guid (nothing that would be immediately identifiable, but a unique identifier so that I can do a Distinct Unique Count of Known Users)
  • If there is a subscription model on the site, the subscription the logged in user has

 

Then I look at the specifics of my site type and what information would make sense to collect.. like for our News sites, things like the Article Title, UUID, Author(s), Publishing Date (even though this is stored as text, I can use other tools to parse as a date if needed), other stuff about the article, then I use events to track things like "is sponsored", or "had multimedia", or "commenting enabled"

 

Then I also make sure on Subscription based sites to track on the page view when the Sub Wall is shown vs not, so we can see "real article reads" vs "all article page views"

 

A lot of this started small and grew with time.. seeing what worked, what didn't work, what could use improvements, what tweaks I could make and how I could get more information... 

 

But don't try and do everything at once.. you need to start with what you feel confident with, and what you know you can build reports on...

 

When (if?) we get CJA, my tagging strategy probably won't change too much, but I will learn how to pull more reports with CJA and adjust my tagging to optimize for that infrastructure.

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1 Reply

Avatar

Correct answer by
Community Advisor

If you are exclusively using Adobe Analytics (as opposed to Customer Journey Analytics), you can look at Entry and Exit Pages (using the Entries and Exit metrics and your Page dimension), you can create Flow Diagrams (using Page or maybe custom dimensions like a page type value), you can create funnel reports for specific flows (usually conversion type flows that see where people are falling out of your intended progressions), you can use the Next/Previous Page panels to look specifically at before and after pages for key pages, etc.

 

There are a lot of things you can pull from a basic implementation.. however, depending on your website and what type of granular data you need/want to have available, that is where you really need to figure out what type of information to include as part of your tracking.

 

I deal with a lot of different types of sites, there are a few things I always include in my standard array of tracking, such as:

  • page type (home, section, article, listing, etc)
  • replication Page Name (that I make sure is sent on all pages and all actions like clicks)
  • URL (also on all pages and actions)
  • breakpoint (for responsive sites so I know how they were viewing the content)
  • site section (like the categorization, but I bundle generic pages under a generic section so there is always a value)
  • Logged In Status (if there is a log in - basically yes or no)
  • User ID / Guid (nothing that would be immediately identifiable, but a unique identifier so that I can do a Distinct Unique Count of Known Users)
  • If there is a subscription model on the site, the subscription the logged in user has

 

Then I look at the specifics of my site type and what information would make sense to collect.. like for our News sites, things like the Article Title, UUID, Author(s), Publishing Date (even though this is stored as text, I can use other tools to parse as a date if needed), other stuff about the article, then I use events to track things like "is sponsored", or "had multimedia", or "commenting enabled"

 

Then I also make sure on Subscription based sites to track on the page view when the Sub Wall is shown vs not, so we can see "real article reads" vs "all article page views"

 

A lot of this started small and grew with time.. seeing what worked, what didn't work, what could use improvements, what tweaks I could make and how I could get more information... 

 

But don't try and do everything at once.. you need to start with what you feel confident with, and what you know you can build reports on...

 

When (if?) we get CJA, my tagging strategy probably won't change too much, but I will learn how to pull more reports with CJA and adjust my tagging to optimize for that infrastructure.