Replies

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Phillipuk

10-09-2018

"We have heard your voice loud and clear that you don't want Ad Hoc to go away....Strategically, it will allow Adobe to develop more features for in-depth analysis, instead of maintaining multiple tools."

It's nice that Adobe heard us.  Unfortunately, Adobe chose the wrong tool to focus on.  That's the bottom line from many a point of view.

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frankd55973318

13-09-2018

Like lots of others in here, I think it is a real shame that Ad-hoc is being killed as it is by far the best analysis tool in the AA suite. Workspace is nice for dashboards and quick analysis but doesn't hold a candle to Ad-Hoc for deeper analysis.

The one thing that would severely lessen the pain of being forced to use Workspace is if you brought in the table builder from Ad-hoc. Another user posted this idea earlier this year. https://forums.adobe.com/ideas/10223#comment-224880. This would make it much quicker to create and alter reports.

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jen_lasser

Employee

13-09-2018

Thanks for this feedback. We agree that a table builder-like feature is important to have in Workspace before access to AHA ends. We are planning on building an advanced query building experience into Workspace, one that is similar to table builder in AHA but also much improved. This is something we are currently in development on and are targeting for release in the spring, ahead of AHA EOL.

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bsziklasi

26-09-2018

Hey jen.lasser,

I wanted to take the opportunity to chime in with some thoughts.  I appreciate the transparency and the requests for feedback, and while I share the displeasure of many others in this thread, I understand Adobe's point of view - it's simply not cost effective to maintain multiple tool-sets that could potentially be rolled into one tool, ideally covering all user needs.

As someone who has (on multiple occasions) been a part of talks debating migrating an organization from Adobe Analytics to a competing tool, I can tell you that it's the 8-10% of power users in the organization that make that final call.  The remaining 90% of occasional users in the org rely on the tools that the core analytics team ultimately selects to implement.  These users tend to use the simplest, most user-friendly toolsets available.  For the 8-10%, Ad-hoc analysis, and more generally the ability to perform advanced deep dive analysis, has always been the main sticking point in these conversations - Adobe, in the past, has been ahead of the competition in this area.

However, this is less and less the case.  Knowing the advanced toolsets are being stripped out, and with little confidence in the proposed replacements, Adobe continues to lose ground in this area.  Your main competitor has recently introduced their 'advanced analysis' toolset to compete with workspace analysis.  But what's far more important and relevant than this, is they now allow for a one-click integration into an Enterprise level, cloud-based data warehouse.  This solution allows customers to use toolsets of their selection for advanced analysis (See Looker, Tableau, R, etc.) in a way that doesn't require constant limited exports and extracts of Data, and jumping through Hoops to get out of Adobe's walled garden.

What the retirement of Ad-Hoc analysis truly does, is highlight true shortcomings of the product for advanced users.  I'm obviously only one person, with knowledge of experiences and opinions from only a few colleagues at a few organizations.  While I respect the use of data to drive your product roadmap forwards, I hope you have taken customer segmentation into account, and are listening to the needs of your clients that drive analytics roadmaps within their organizations.

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ashert33772002

26-09-2018

For my team we're going to move to using more SQL based analysis for deeper analytics once Ad Hoc is sunset as the current tool set won't allow for the types of analytics we currently do. Once that happens Adobe will have lost a lot of what makes it desirable as an Analysis tool.

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BenjaminGaines

Employee

26-09-2018

Thanks for sharing this feedback. I have a ton of thoughts, but I'll try to be concise.

First, clearly the ability to query data and get it out quickly and easily is more important to analysts than it was five years ago. I think it's already been publicly announced that we're hard at work on Adobe Experience Platform (AEP), which is a place to bring all relevant customer data together in one place to power your experience optimization and marketing. Part of AEP includes a SQL interface with export capabilities as well as built-in connectors to front-end tools like Power BI and Tableau. Of course, the proof should be in the pudding, but where some tools are mimicking (poorly, BTW) Analysis Workspace, we're also working on a solution to address the need to build custom queries and take data out more effectively than you can today with Data Feeds.

Second, as I think has been stated elsewhere on this thread, generally speaking the signal from our broader user base -- both quantitatively and qualitatively -- has been strong in favor of Analysis Workspace allowing deeper and more flexible advanced analysis than Ad Hoc Analysis allows you to do. Even just Attribution IQ alone should open up dozens of new use cases for analysis for every brand who has adopted Analysis Workspace. There certainly are some gaps between the two products, which Jen has described on this thread and on the migration page that we've posted, but those are being addressed on the product roadmap. And we've said repeatedly that we're keeping Ad Hoc Analysis around until you and we are satisfied that those gaps have been closed.

Third, looking at the landscape for the customer intelligence BI market, the idea of Analysis Workspace -- with its speed and flexibility --running on top of AEP, with all of your relevant customer data across channels flowing into it, stitched together however you want, and with its connections to points of action like Adobe Target, Adobe Audience Manager, Adobe Campaign, and Adobe Media Optimizer -- and even embedded within those tools -- are really compelling, we believe. It may not be quite the same path that others are pursuing, but that's intentional. If that isn't enough for an analyst to get excited about the possibilities, then I don't know what to tell you. From where I sit, talking to hundreds of brands every year about their analytics goals, the future is exciting indeed. But we only get there as quickly as everyone wants if we focus our efforts on our primary analytics environment, which is Analysis Workspace.

Best,

Ben Gaines

Group Product Manager

Adobe Analytics

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Phillipuk

26-09-2018

Agreed.  This is MVP for the LCD.

If you want more capabilities, you have to upgrade to Adobe Analytics Premium for additional cost.

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ashert33772002

27-09-2018

How many users were aware of Ad Hoc or were using Ad Hoc that said they preferred Workspace?

I have plenty of user I recommending Workspace to as it is a vast improvement over the SC interface. It is going to give them more self service options and ultimately make what they do easier. However these are not our power users. Those like myself that spend a significant amount of time in Ad Hoc are not looking forward to this forced change and feel that were are losing more than we gain. Those things that are gained could have been developed for Ad Hoc but were instead developed for a lesser tool.

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Phillipuk

27-09-2018

ashert33772002​  This is one of my earlier posts...

"Adobe's been trying unsuccessfully to end the life of Ad Hoc for several years now, and replace it with Workspace."

 

"In the recent announcements they quote a low number of Ad Hoc users.  Somewhere in these comments, someone said that's because most nubee's aren't aware of it.  I would concur.  When I work with younger analysts, and turn them on to Ad Hoc, I usually get two comments:

  1. "I didn't know this existed."  and
  2. "WOW!  THANKS FOR TURNING ME ON TO THIS APP!  WAY BETTER!"

"Internally at my company there has been a lot of griping about this among analysts (not just report jockeys)."